2014‑15 Report on Plans and Priorities

____________________________
The Honourable Robert Nicholson
Minister of National Defence

© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, represented by the Military Police Complaints Commission of Canada, 2014.

ISSN 2292‑4590

Table of Contents

Preface

2014–15
Estimates

Part III – Departmental Expenditure Plans: Reports on Plans and Priorities

Purpose

Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPP) are individual expenditure plans for each department and agency. These reports provide increased levels of detail over a three-year period on an organization's main priorities by strategic outcome, program and planned/expected results, including links to related resource requirements presented in the Main Estimates. In conjunction with the Main Estimates, RPP serve to inform members of Parliament on planned expenditures of departments and agencies, and support Parliament's consideration of supply bills. The RPPs are typically tabled soon after the Main Estimates by the President of the Treasury Board (TB).

Estimates Documents

The Estimates are comprised of three parts:

Part I – Government Expenditure Plan - provides an overview of the Government's requirements and changes in estimated expenditures from previous fiscal years.

Part II – Main Estimates - supports the appropriation acts with detailed information on the estimated spending and authorities being sought by each federal organization requesting appropriations.

In accordance with Standing Orders of the House of Commons, Parts I and II must be tabled on or before March 1st.

Part III – Departmental Expenditure Plans - consists of two components:

DPRs are individual department and agency accounts of results achieved against planned performance expectations as set out in respective RPPs.

The DPRs for the most recently completed fiscal year are tabled in the fall by the President of the TB.

Supplementary Estimates support Appropriation Acts presented later in the fiscal year. Supplementary Estimates present information on spending requirements that were either not sufficiently developed in time for inclusion in the Main Estimates or have subsequently been refined to account for developments in particular programs and services. Supplementary Estimates also provide information on changes to expenditure forecasts of major statutory items as well as on such items as: transfers of funds between votes; debt deletion; loan guarantees; and new or increased grants.

For more information on the Estimates, please consult the Treasury Board Secretariat (TBS) website.

Links to the Estimates

As shown above, RPPs make up part of the Part III of the Estimates documents. Whereas Part II emphasizes the financial aspect of the Estimates, Part III focuses on financial and non-financial performance information, both from a planning and priorities standpoint (RPP), and an achievements and results perspective (DPR).

The Management Resources and Results Structure (MRRS) establishes a structure for display of financial information in the Estimates and reporting to Parliament via RPPs and DPRs. When displaying planned spending, RPPs rely on the Estimates as a basic source of financial information.

Main Estimates expenditure figures are based on the Annual Reference Level Update which is prepared in the fall. In comparison, planned spending found in RPPs includes the Estimates as well as any other amounts that have been approved through a TB submission up to February 1st (See Definitions section). This readjusting of the financial figures allows for a more up-to-date portrait of planned spending by program.

Changes to the presentation of the Report on Plans and Priorities

Several changes have been made to the presentation of the RPP partially to respond to a number of requests – from the House of Commons Standing Committees on Public Accounts (PAC - Report 15), in 2010; and on Government and Operations Estimates (OGGO - Report 7), in 2012 – to provide more detailed financial and non-financial performance information about programs within RPPs and DPRs, thus improving the ease of their study to support appropriations approval.

How to read this document

RPPs are divided into four sections:

Section I: Organizational Expenditure Overview

This Organizational Expenditure Overview allows the reader to get a general glance at the organization. It provides a description of the organization’s purpose, as well as basic financial and human resources information. This section opens with the new Organizational Profile, which displays general information about the organization, including the names of the minister and the deputy head, the ministerial portfolio, the year the organization was established, and the main legislative authorities. This subsection is followed by a new subsection entitled Organizational Context, which includes the Raison d’être, the Responsibilities, the Strategic Outcomes and Program Alignment Architecture, the Organizational Priorities and the Risk Analysis. This section ends with the Planned Expenditures, the Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes, the Estimates by Votes and the Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy. It should be noted that this section does not display any non-financial performance information related to programs (please see Section II).

Section II: Analysis of Program(s) by Strategic Outcome(s)

This section provides detailed financial and non-financial performance information for strategic outcomes, programs and sub-programs. This section allows the reader to learn more about programs by reading their respective description and narrative entitled “Planning Highlights”. This narrative speaks to key services or initiatives which support the plans and priorities presented in Section I; it also describes how performance information supports the organization’s strategic outcome or parent program.

Section III: Supplementary Information

This section provides supporting information related to organizational plans and priorities. In this section, the reader will find future-oriented statement of operations and a link to supplementary information tables regarding transfer payments, as well as information related to the greening government operations, internal audits and evaluations, horizontal initiatives, user fees, major crown and transformational projects, and up-front multi-year funding, where applicable to individual organizations. The reader will also find a link to the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication, produced annually by the Minister of Finance, which provides estimates and projections of the revenue impacts of federal tax measures designed to support the economic and social priorities of the Government of Canada.

Section IV: Organizational Contact Information

In this last section, the reader will have access to organizational contact information.

Definitions

Appropriation
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
Budgetary vs. Non-budgetary Expenditures
Budgetary expenditures – operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to crown corporations.
Non-budgetary expenditures – net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
Expected Result
An outcome that a program is designed to achieve.
Full-Time Equivalent (FTE)
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. FTEs are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.
Government of Canada Outcomes
A set of high-level objectives defined for the government as a whole.
Management Resources and Results Structure (MRRS)
A common approach and structure to the collection, management and reporting of financial and non-financial performance information.
An MRRS provides detailed information on all organizational programs (e.g.: program costs, program expected results and their associated targets, how they align to the government’s priorities and intended outcomes, etc.) and establishes the same structure for both internal decision making and external accountability.
Planned Spending
For the purpose of the RPP, planned spending refers to those amounts for which a TB submission approval has been received by no later than February 1, 2014. This cut-off date differs from the Main Estimates process. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditure levels presented in the 2014–15 Main Estimates.
Program
A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results, and that are treated as a budgetary unit.
Program Alignment Architecture
A structured inventory of an organization’s programs, where programs are arranged in a hierarchical manner to depict the logical relationship between each program and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.
Spending Areas
Government of Canada categories of expenditures. There are four spending areas (social affairs, economic affairs, international affairs and government affairs) each comprised of three to five Government of Canada outcomes.
Strategic Outcome
A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization's mandate, vision, and core functions.
Sunset Program
A time-limited program that does not have on-going funding or policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made as to whether to continue the program. (In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration).
Whole-of-Government Framework
A map of the financial and non-financial contributions of federal organizations receiving appropriations that aligns their Programs to a set of high level outcome areas defined for the government as a whole.

Chairperson’s Message

I am pleased to present the 2014–15 Report on Plans and Priorities (RPP) of the Military Police Complaints Commission (the Commission). The Commission’s role to provide independent civilian oversight of the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) Military Police (MP) includes providing greater public accountability by the MP and the chain of command in relation to MP investigations, promoting and ensuring the highest standards of conduct of the MP in the performance of policing duties and discouraging interference in any MP investigations. This RPP details the plans of the Commission to fulfil its role and mandate.

Three priorities are reflected in the RPP: two related to improving the effectiveness and efficiency of the Complaints Resolution Program and one related to improving governance in support of the Complaints Resolution Program. These priorities support the Commission’s Strategic Outcome which states: the Commission ensures that the Canadian Forces Military Police has the highest standard of conduct according to law and police best practices, and is free from interference in its investigations.

The operating environment of the Commission continues to be challenged by various complex conduct and interference complaints. In 2014, the Commission will be issuing the Fynes Public Interest Hearing (PIH) Interim Report and will deliver all findings and recommendations related to complaints regarding MP investigations in the March 2008 death of Corporal Stuart Langridge, in its Final Report. This particular PIH began with a case conference on October 19, 2011, and concluded with final submissions and closing arguments on January 9, 2013. The PIH encompassed more than 12,500 pages of transcript, 183 exhibits, 62 hearings days and testimony from more than 90 witnesses.

The Commission will continue to observe developments and pursue its proposals to amend the National Defence Act (NDA). Proposed amendments to the NDA by the Commission relate to the need for legislative improvement, such as, access to relevant information and evidence in order to fully and credibly investigate complaints, allowing the Commission to fulfil the mandate envisioned by Parliament. The Commission will seek opportunities to pursue its proposals wherever possible.

With a growing number of interested parties and participation at the Commission’s outreach presentations at CAF bases across Canada, the Commission will continue to meet its primary audiences in efforts to increase awareness of its mandate and activities and to respond to any concerns regarding the complaints process.

The Commission bid farewell to Colonel (Col) Timothy Grubb and welcomed Colonel (Col) Rob Delaney in his new role as Canadian Forces Provost Marshal (CFPM). The Commission looks forward to working with Col Delaney and building on the open lines of communication and collaboration. The Commission continues to work collaboratively with the CFPM, the Deputy Commander Canadian Forces Military Police Group/Professional Standards, other senior MP officials, the MP community and our partners and stakeholders.

In closing, the Commission staff will continue to demonstrate the spirit of integrity, mutual respect, cooperation and collaboration they have consistently demonstrated in the past. Supported by this level of professionalism, I remain committed to the Commission’s important work of providing civilian oversight of CAF MP in a manner that continues to be effective, efficient, and fair to all concerned.

_______________________
Glenn M. Stannard, O.O.M.
Chairperson

Section I: Organizational Expenditure Overview

Organizational Profile

Minister: The Honourable Robert Nicholson

Deputy Head: Mr. Glenn Stannard

Ministerial Portfolio: Defence Portfolio

Year Established: 1998

Main Legislative Authority: National Defence Act, Part IV

For more information, please visit the Commission’s website.

Organizational Context

Raison d’être

On behalf of all Canadians, the Military Police Complaints Commission (the Commission) exists to provide greater public accountability by the Military Police (MP) and the chain of command in relation to Military Police activities. The Commission derives its mandate from Part IV of Canada's National Defence Act (NDA).

Responsibilities

The Commission’s mandate is to:

The Commission’s mission is to promote and ensure the highest standards of conduct of MP in the performance of policing duties and to discourage interference in any MP investigation.

The Commission fulfils its mandate and mission by exercising the following responsibilities:

In fulfilling its independent civilian oversight responsibilities, the Commission has a crucially important working relationship with the CFPM and the Deputy Commander Canadian Forces Military Police Group/Professional Standards (DComd CF MP Gp/PS). On April 1, 2011, the CFPM assumed full command of all MP members who are directly involved in policing. The CFPM also assigns MP elements to other supported commanders under operational command.

The DComd CF MP Gp/PS manages public complaint and internal MP conduct investigations and ensures adherence to the Military Police Professional Code of Conduct.

Fostering a mutually respectful working relationship between the Commission, the CFPM and DComd CF MP Gp/PS facilitates the conduct of complaint investigations and the likelihood that recommendations will be accepted and implemented.

For more information on the Commission, please visit the Commission’s About Us web page.

Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture

1. Strategic Outcome: The Military Police Complaints Commission (MPCC) ensures the Canadian Forces Military Police has the highest standard of conduct according to law and police best practices, and is free from interference in its investigations.

1.1. Complaints Resolution

Internal Services

Organizational Priorities

Organizational Priority 1
Priority TypeFootnote 1 Strategic Outcome and/or Program
Priority 1: Improving the effectiveness and efficiency of the complaints resolution process. Ongoing Complaints Resolution
Description

Priority 1: Why is this a priority?

Improving the effectiveness and efficiency of the complaints resolution process is fundamental to achieving the Commission’s Strategic Outcome which is that conduct complaints against the MP and interference complaints by the MP are resolved in a fair and timely manner and recommendations made are implemented by the Department of National Defence (DND) and / or the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF).

What are the plans for meeting Priority 1?

Continued, Effective Collaboration: The Commission has no control over the complaints received or the resulting volume, complexity and size of the investigations. As a result, the Commission will continue to refine the planning and conduct of its investigations. Timely, well-completed investigations will result, where required. The Commission will continue to work with the Chief of the Defence Staff (CDS), the CFPM, the DComd CF MP Gp/PS and other senior MP staff, partners and stakeholders to foster an environment that supports the acceptance and implementation of recommendations.

Outreach: In order to promote a greater appreciation and understanding of its mandate and its complaints resolution process, the Commission will continue its Outreach Program at CAF bases and its presentations to participants at the Qualifying Level 6A and 6B and Military Police Officer Course at the Canadian Forces Military Police Academy in Borden, Ontario. These base visits and other presentations allow stakeholders to gain a further appreciation of the Commission, how it operates and allows the Commission to further expand its knowledge of the many challenges faced by the MP.

Organizational Priority 2
Priority TypeFootnote 1 Strategic Outcome and/or Program
Priority 2: Provision of meaningful recommendations. Ongoing Complaints Resolution
Description

Priority 2: Why is this a priority?

This is a priority because the provision of meaningful recommendations increase the likelihood the specific and systematic issues identified for change will be agreed upon and the improvements recommended will be implemented. The changes made will improve the quality of military policing and contribute directly to maintaining the confidence and support of those served by the MP.

What are the plans for meeting Priority 2?

Refining the Planning and Conduct of Investigations: meaningful recommendations for changes in MP conduct (including addressing systemic issues) that are accepted and implemented.

Organizational Priority 3
Priority TypeFootnote 1 Strategic Outcome and/or Program
Priority 3: Improving Internal Services Ongoing Internal Services
Description

Priority 3: Why is this a priority?

Improving Internal Services is a priority because it provides fundamental support to the Complaints Resolution Program and to the achievement of the Commission’s Strategic Outcome and legislative mandate.

What are the plans for meeting Priority 3?

To ensure a high level standard for Internal Services through the Commission’s Management Accountability Framework (MAF).

The Commission has implemented a new Internal Services structure to ensure a level of standards that meets the organization’s needs. The Commission continues to update these frameworks, when required and in some cases, annually, in addition to implementing required policies, directives and standards.

The Commission will undergo self-assessments through management reviews including all formal evaluations and audits to validate the Internal Services frameworks and other instruments. For example, the Commission has improved business and program areas such as finance, contracts, human resources and Access to Information and Privacy (ATIP) as a result of these reviews, which demonstrates the Commission’s ongoing commitment to strong stewardship.

Risk Analysis

Key Risks
Risk Risk Response Strategy Link to Program Alignment Architecture
Operational Demands
  • The Commission will follow its critical path in the conduct of complaints.
  • The Commission will remain open to improvements and refinements of its critical path to accommodate unique circumstances.
  • The Commission will examine case management, administrative and other options such as procedural efficiencies and technology applications optimization of available resources.
Complaints Resolution

Internal Services
Human Resources
  • The Commission’s Integrated Business and Human Resource Framework – Plans and Strategies will be updated to align with the Common Human Resource Business Plan (CHRBP).
  • The Commission will continue to explore other opportunities to even further strengthen its management of human resources and reinforce a positive and productive environment.
  • The Commission will continue to stress effective human resource planning to help ensure that knowledge is retained through activities (e.g. knowledge transfer, employee learning plans).
  • The Commission will continue to strive to appropriately fill vacancies as quickly as possible.
Complaints Resolution

Internal Services
Reporting Burden
  • The Commission will continue to explore efficient ways to meet the reporting demands. In order to reduce the number of pages and costs, the Commission will identify duplication of information and replace it, by adding a link within the report to the Commission’s website, when possible. To accomplish this, web pages will be added, when necessary, to the Commission’s website in an effort to centralize pertinent information.
Complaints Resolution

Internal Services

The Commission manages a number of conduct reviews and interference investigations annually. The complaints are unpredictable and diverse. During the 2013–14 fiscal year (FY), the Commission received increasingly new types of complaints and allegations. Due to these new challenges, the Commission needs to review its investigation techniques. This requires research into new subject areas which increases the level of effort required to identify and gather new information, create a new knowledge base with specialized training and experience in these new fields. As a result, the processes, resources and the time required to prepare reports impact the duration from receipt to issuance of a Final Report. The risks increase whenever a Public Interest Investigation or Hearing is launched.

The effectiveness of the Commission depends largely on the knowledge and stability of its workforce. As is the case of all micro-agencies, it is difficult to retain employees when the size and flatness of the organization impacts opportunities for advancement.

As employees of a micro-agency, Commission staff may oversee several programs and services. When staffing of a position is lengthy, the delay results in an increased cost to the Commission who uses consultants to oversee the duties of the vacant position. In addition, the Commission might also transfer some, if not all duties, increasing the workload of other employees already fulfilling their existing responsibilities.

Increased accountability and transparency standards mandated by the federal government have lengthened the staffing process and made it more difficult to staff positions in a timely manner. The Commission’s Integrated Business and Human Resource Framework – Plans and Strategies will be updated to align with the CHRBP, which was endorsed as the government wide standard for managing human resources.

With increased central agency standards in strategic planning, reporting, finance, human resources, staffing, security, ATIP, records and information management and heightened quality assurance expectations, the Commission requires the assistance of a range of service providers to meet new policy requirements, representing over 100 reports.

The Commission conducted an organizational review and discovered shortfalls due to external pressures which were impacting the Commission’s program integrity. As such the Commission went through a re-organization and increased the total number of full time equivalents (FTEs). The Commission will focus on staffing the new positions and streamlining its Internal Services to become more efficient.

Planned Expenditures

Budgetary Financial Resources (Planned Spending—dollars)
2014–15 Main Estimates 2014–15 Planned Spending 2015–16 Planned Spending 2016–17 Planned Spending
5.6 5.6 4.7 4.7
Human Resources (Full-time Equivalents)
2014–15 2015–16 2016–17
30 30 30
Budgetary Planning Summary for Strategic Outcome and Program (dollars)
Strategic Outcome, Program and Internal Services 2011–12 Expenditures 2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Forecast Spending 2014–15 Main Estimates 2014–15 Planned Spending 2015–16 Planned Spending 2016–17 Planned Spending
Strategic Outcome 1: The Military Police Complaints Commission (MPCC) ensures that the Canadian Forces Military Police has the highest standard of conduct according to law and police best practices, and is free from interference in its investigations.
Complaints Resolution 2.7 3.2 3.8 2.8 2.8 2.8 2.8
Strategic Outcome 1 Subtotal 2.7 3.2 3.8 2.8 2.8 2.8 2.8
Internal Services Subtotal 2.2 2.1 2.2 2.8 2.8 1.9 1.9
Total 4.9 5.3 6.0 5.6 5.6 4.7 4.7

The Commission’s traditional on-going budget was approximately $3.5M.

Increases in the budget since FY 2008–09 were due to sunset funding provided for Public Interest Hearings (PIH) and a large multi-jurisdictional conduct review. In the past number of years, the Commission has experienced financial pressures due to increasing complexity of investigations, increased planning and reporting requirements, and increased information management requirements.

In FY 2012–13, the Commission conducted an organizational and program review to determine the level of resources required to effectively deliver its program on an on-going basis. The review determined that the Commission was experiencing a shortfall in program funding and human resources.

In FY 2013–14, the Commission requested an increase in its reference levels. The Department of National Defence (DND) identified available funding and transferred a one-time transfer in the FY 2013–14 of $2.2M and an ongoing amount of $1.2M beginning in FY 2014–15 to support the Commission’s program integrity.

Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes

2014–15 Planned Spending by Whole-of-Government-Framework Spending Area (dollars)

2014–15 Planned Spending by Whole-of-Government-Framework Spending Area (dollars)
Strategic Outcome Program Spending Area Government of Canada Outcome 2014-15
Planned Spending
The Military Police Complaints Commission (MPCC) ensures that the Canadian Forces Military Police has the highest standard of conduct according to law and police best practices, and is free from interference in its investigations. Complaints Resolution Social Affairs Safe and Secure Canada 5.6
Total Planned Spending by Spending Area (dollars)
Spending Area Total Planned Spending
Economic Affairs -
Social Affairs 5.6
International Affairs -
Government Affairs -

Departmental Spending Trend

Departmental Spending Trend Graph

Departmental Spending Trend (dollars in thousands)
Actual Spending Planned Spending Forecast Spending
Fiscal Year 2011–12 Fiscal Year 2012–13 Fiscal Year 2013–14 Fiscal Year 2014–15 Fiscal Year 2015–16 Fiscal Year 2016–17
Total Spending 3,605.2 3,573.4 3,645.3 5,618.5 4,673.5 4,673.5
Sunset Funding 1,317.7 1,728.1 2,396.1 0.0 0.0 0.0

The Commission is a micro-agency located in Ottawa. Since FY 2006–07, the Commission has operated with 21 FTEs and a program budget of $3.5M allocated to its regular operations.

In September 2011, the Commission sought and obtained approval to spend an additional $2.5M over a three year period to cover the cost of holding the Fynes PIH regarding MP investigations relating to the death of Corporal Stuart Langridge.

During the Fynes PIH initial phases, the Commission had to readjust the PIH plan, update the budget plan to include unplanned and unanticipated activities, and readjust the hearing schedule itself due to delays in the startup. The main reason for the revised PIH plan was due to the additional two months of hearings combined with a two month pre-hearing preparation. These events were not foreseeable until well into the PIH. Furthermore, additional legal requirements which were not anticipated by any of the parties until recently have been identified. Even at this stage of the PIH, additional unplanned and unforeseen activities continue to surface. As a result, in September 2012, the Commission sought and secured approval for additional funding for the Fynes PIH in the amount of $3.3M over three years beginning in FY 2012–13. This funding is for the PIH only and is not part of the Commission’s A-base.

At the same time, the Commission sought and obtained additional funding of $1.7M over a three-year period, to support a conduct complaint review of a multi-jurisdictional investigation. The additional funding is for this purpose only and is not part of the Commission’s A-base.

In FY 2012–13, the Commission sought a one-time transfer of $2.2M for FY 2013–14 and an on-going transfer of $1.1M per year, starting in 2014–15. The Commission revised on-going budget will be $4.7M.

Estimates by Vote

For information on the Commission’s organizational appropriations, please see the 2014–15 Main Estimates publication.

Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy

The 2013–16 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) tabled on November 4, 2013, guides the Government of Canada’s 2013–16 sustainable development activities. The FSDS articulates Canada’s federal sustainable development priorities for a period of three years, as required by the Federal Sustainable Development Act.

The Commission contributes to Theme IV - Shrinking the Environmental Footprint – Beginning with Government as denoted by the following visual identifier:

Theme IV - Shrinking the Environmental Footprint – Beginning with Government

The Commission also ensures its decision-making process includes a consideration of the FSDS goals and targets through the strategic environmental assessment (SEA). An SEA for policy, plan or program proposals includes an analysis of the impacts of the proposal on the environment, including on the FSDS goals and targets. The results of SEAs are made public when an initiative is announced or approved, demonstrating that environmental factors were integrated into the decision-making process.

For additional details on the Commission’s activities to support sustainable development please see Section II of this RPP and the Greening Government Operations Supplementary Information Table.

For complete details on the FSDS, please see the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy website.

Section II: Analysis of Program by Strategic Outcome

Strategic Outcome

The Military Police Complaints Commission (MPCC) ensures the Canadian Forces Military Police has the highest standard of conduct according to law and police best practices, and is free from interference in its investigations.

Program 1.1: Complaints Resolution

Description

This program aims to successfully resolve conduct complaints regarding Military Police (MP) members as well as interference complaints with MP investigations by overseeing and reviewing all complaints received. This program is necessary to help the MP to be as effective and as professional as possible in their policing duties and functions.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15 Main Estimates 2014–15 Planned Spending 2015–16 Planned Spending 2016–17 Planned Spending
2.8 2.8 2.8 2.8
Human Resources (Full-time Equivalents)
2014–15 2015–16 2016–17
11 11 11
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Recommendations resulting from investigations of conduct or interference complaints are accepted by the Department of National Defence (DND) and / or the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF). % of the recommendations accepted 70% March 31, 2015
Investigations / complaints resulting from investigations of conduct or interference complaints resolved within targeted timeframes as established by the Commission’s Chairperson. % Improvements made 70% March 31, 2015

Planning Highlights

To achieve the expected results of the Complaints Resolution Program, the Military Police Complaints Commission (the Commission) will continue to complete its investigations in accordance with the critical path developed specifically for each investigation, with refinements made as needed and to reflect the complexities, demands and implications of a large case.

While setting appropriate performance targets remains a challenge due to uniquely different types of investigation cases, the Commission will continue to ensure performance targets accurately reflect the changing scope, size and complexity of the investigations it undertakes.

The Commission will continue to review the complaints resolution process to identify opportunities for cost savings through the identification and optimization of operational efficiencies. Outsourcing of investigative services and expanding the roster of investigators will enable to the Commission to better match investigator skill sets with requirements. Plausible options to enhance investigative capacity will be reviewed to reinforce organizational sustainability.

The Commission will continue its Outreach Program in efforts to increase awareness of its mandate and activities and expand the numbers of stakeholders who are informed about the purpose, objectivity and fairness of the conduct and interference complaints resolution processes.

The Commission will continue its productive working relationship with the Canadian Forces Provost Marshal (CFPM), the Deputy Commander Canadian Forces Military Group / Professional Standards (DComd CF MP Gp/PS) and other CAF / DND representatives who facilitate the conduct of investigations, receptiveness to recommendations and implementation of said recommendations. The Commission will continue to cultivate mutually beneficial working relationships with other government departments and agencies, professional associations and intra-government affiliations to identify and achieve practical solutions to common operational and administrative issues.

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. These groups are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; Acquisition Services; and Other Administrative Services. Internal Services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not to those provided specifically to a program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15 Main Estimates 2014–15 Planned Spending 2015–16 Planned Spending 2016–17 Planned Spending
2.8 2.8 1.9 1.9
Human Resources (Full-time Equivalents)
2014–15 2015–16 2016–17
19 19 19

Planning Highlights

The Commission’s Internal Services will continuously find innovative ways to ensure programs and services meet the operational demands of the Complaints Resolution Program and central agency requirements. In addition, the Commission plans to review and incorporate the 2020 Blueprint throughout the organization by incorporating a sound change management process. This includes a new Enterprise Document and Records Management Solution, implementation of the Common Human Resources Business Processes, greening opportunities, etc.

Through its Internal Services, the Commission contributes to the following target areas of Theme IV (Shrinking the Environmental Footprint–Beginning with Government) of the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy: green procurement, e-waste, managed print, paper consumption and green meetings.

Additional details on the Commission's activities can be found in the Greening Government Operations Supplementary Information Table.

Section III: Supplementary Information

Future-Oriented Statement of Operations

The Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations presented in this subsection is intended to serve as a general overview of the Military Police Complaints Commission’s (the Commission) operations. The forecasted financial information on expenses and revenues are prepared on an accrual accounting basis to strengthen accountability and to improve transparency and financial management.

Because the Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations is prepared on an accrual accounting basis and the forecast and planned spending amounts presented in other sections of this report are prepared on an expenditure basis, amounts will differ.

A detailed Future-Oriented Statement of Operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net costs of operations to the requested authorities, can be found on the Commission’s website.

Future Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations
For the Year Ended March 31 (dollars)
Financial information Estimated Results
2013−14
Planned Results
2014–15
Change
Total expenses 6.3 5.3 (1.0)
Total revenues - - -
Net cost of operations 6.3 5.3 (1.0)

The Commission expects the organization’s 2014-15 planned results to be slightly lower than the 2013-14 estimated results. However, the Commission’s ongoing expenditures are expected to increase due to anticipated staffing, increasingly complex conduct reviews, accommodation costs and electronic document management and recordkeeping management infrastructure improvements.

List of Supplementary Information Tables

The supplementary information tables listed in the 2014–15 Report on Plans and Priorities can be found on the Commission’s website.

Tax Expenditures and Evaluations

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures annually in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication. The tax measures presented in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication are the sole responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Section IV: Organizational Contact Information

How to reach the Commission:

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