2007-2008 Annual Review on Official Languages

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April 2008

Background

Section of 48 of the Official Languages Act requires that a report on the status of official languages policies and programs in federal institutions subject to the Official Languages Act be tabled in the Parliament each year. Accountability for fulfillment of this requirement is shared by Treasury Board, the Official Languages Branch of the Public Service Human Resources Management Agency of Canada and the deputy heads of federal institutions. More specifically, Treasury Board is accountable for development and general coordination of official languages policies and programs. The Public Service Human Resources Management Agency of Canada is accountable for monitoring and improving application of official languages policies and programs, and the deputy heads of federal institutions hold accountability for compliance with the Official Languages Act and policies that flow from it.

Monitoring the Effectiveness of Official Languages Policies

In consideration of the importance of effective human resource management to sustained employment of a competent, engaged and diverse public service in the face of scarce talent, looming labour shortages, the enormous costs of disenchanted employees, and the growing need to manage a cross-generational workforce, the Public Service Human Resources Management Agency of Canada is focused on accelerating progress on the agenda to modernize management of the federal public service. To this end, the Official Languages Branch of the Agency has been implementing a new results-oriented model created to improve both the monitoring and effectiveness of official languages policies and programs.

As a result of the improved monitoring and assessment of official languages policy implementation, the Public Service Human Resources Agency of Canada decided that a full review on official languages is not required of the Military Police Complaints Commission for 2007-2008. Rather, since the Commission is a very small agency (17 FTEs and $3.5 million budget) that is not experiencing problems complying with official languages policy, the Agency has requested only a quantitative review from the Commission.

Compliant with Section 48 of the Official Languages Act, Treasury Board's new Official Languages Policy Framework and the Public Service Human Resources Management Agency of Canada's request for input to the Annual Review on Official Languages for 2007-2008 the Military Police Complaints Commission is pleased to provide the following Quantitative Review Report.

1.0 Quantitative Review Report

1.1 Costs of Language Training

1.1.1 Activities Carried Out in 2007-2008

The Commission is a micro-sized organization consisting of 17 FTEs ($3.5 million budget). As at March 2008, there are seventeen full time positions, two of which are vacant, and of one which the incumbent is on long term disability. Two term positions were created to assist the Commission in meeting its operational mandate until two of the positions can be filled indeterminately. In the case of the third position, that of the Investigator, this vacancy is deliberate.

The creation of an automated system to capture information on the cost of official languages data is not currently feasible from a cost effective or efficiency perspective. Such information is therefore kept manually, by means of a system that allows the Commission to keep track of any language training taken and the associated cost. The Commission performed a review of the linguistic requirements of all positions in the organization.

The Commission also approved language training for personal development for five employees: one indeterminate, one on assignment from another department, two term employees and one casual employee. Costs of language training are associated with two of these individuals and in the other three cases the employees are using the Canada School of Public Service on-line courses at no additional cost to the Commission. Statistical data on costs of language training is set out in section 1.1.3.

As of today, the data on linguistic capacity shows that 100% of employees meet the linguistic profile of their position.

1.1.2 Activities Planned for 2008-2009

Again this year, the Commission continued to ensure delivery of its service, both internally and to the public, in both official languages throughout the review period. All employees responsible for the provision of service to the public meet the relevant language requirements. The Commission will also continue to support language training to help Commission staff to maintain their linguistic capacity and/or enhance their ability in the second official language for personal and career development.

1.1.3 Statistical Data on the Costs of Language Training
a) Cost of French language training provided by the private sector, universities or the School on a cost-recovery basis as part of a memorandum of understanding for non-imperative staffing (including appointments and deployments) n/a
• Number of employees targeted by these costs -
b) Cost of English language training provided by the private sector, universities or the School on a cost-recovery basis as part of the a memorandum of understanding for non-imperative staffing (including appointments and deployments) n/a
• Number of employees targeted by these costs -
c) Other costs of French language training for personal development, career development, a raise in language profile or the re-identification of positions, including training provided by the private sector, universities or the School on a cost-recovery basis as part of a memorandum of understanding or by the institution itself $2,266.00
• Number of employees targeted by these costs 1
d) Other costs of English language training for personal development, career development, a raise in language profile or the re-identification of positions, including training provided by the private sector, universities or the School on a cost-recovery basis as part of a memorandum of understanding or by the institution itself. $588.00
• Number of employees targeted by these costs 1

1.2 Good Practices related to Official Languages

The General Counsel of the Commission has been the Official Languages Champion for the Commission for several years. This demonstrates senior management's commitment to the Official Languages Program and results in overall positive visibility for official languages within the organization.

The Commission continues to be represented at the Departmental Advisory Committee on Official Languages. This enables the organization to take part in consultations on, while keeping abreast of, matters and challenges relating to the orientation and implementation of the Official Languages Program.

In addition, the Commission's human resources service provider, Public Works and Government Services Canada - Shared Human Resources Services (PWGSC - SHRS) gives Commission management the opportunity to be kept abreast of practices in other organizations.

1.2.1 Governance of the Official Languages Program

Leadership

As mentioned previously in the activities carried out in 2007-2008, Commission management provided official languages training for employees interested in maintaining or enhancing their ability in the use of their second official language.

Information Management

As noted in section 1.1.1, the Commission is a micro-sized organization. The information on official languages training cost is captured in the Commission's financial system Common Departmental Financial System.

The Human Resources Information System (HRIS) is an automated system used to capture information on positions and classification, including official languages data. The Commission provides information to PWGSC - SHRS which enters data in the HRIS.

1.2.2 Implementation of the Official Languages Program

Communications with and Services to the Public in both Official Languages

Again this year, the Commission continued to ensure delivery of service to the public in both official languages throughout the review period. All employees responsible for the provision of service to the public meet the relevant language requirements. Employees actively offer the use of the language of choice when interrelating with the public. In addition, when complaints are submitted to the Commission for investigation, parties are offered the use of the language of their choice when they are first contacted. Appropriate signage, including availability and active offer of service, is displayed in both official languages. Care is also taken to ensure that the information posted on the Commission's internet site is of comparable quality in English and in French. No complaints have to date been brought to the Commission's attention regarding the provision of its service in the official languages.

Language of Work

The Commission is committed to a workplace where employees feel at ease using the official language of their choice. Employees are encouraged to use their preferred language of choice in the conduct of daily internal operations, at staff meetings and in e-mails. Internal services, including professional training and development, are available in both official languages, and information/awareness sessions are conducted in a bilingual format. Regularly used work instruments and software are also available in both English and French and we have continued to maintain communications to Commission staff in both official languages and the language of their choice, as the case may be. The representation of employees in the Commission is 10 Anglophones and 7 Francophones.

Human Resources Management

Language requirements for positions are reviewed at the time of every staffing action at the Commission. During the period under review, the Commission initiated 11 staffing actions to be filled on an indeterminate basis all on a bilingual imperative basis. Unfortunately, 4 of these actions were not productive. The Commission's objective is to continue the review of linguistic requirements of positions when staffing in order to confirm the validity of the information and take into consideration any amendments that could have been done to a job description.

1.3 Audit of Active Offer and Service to the Public in both Official Languages in the province of British Columbia

Not applicable.

1.3.1 Activities carried out following this Audit

Not applicable.

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